LSE Student Voter Registration aids in continuing democracy

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LSE Student Voter Registration aids in continuing democracy

Ashley Cole, Design Editor

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Around 200 Southeast students registered to vote in D-Hall on Friday, Jan. 24, during the annual voter registration, hosted by social studies teachers and student volunteers.

Senior Grace Usher helped with the registration and is passionate about voting.

“If half the population isn’t voting, it’s not really a democracy — and most of [the] population is young people,” Usher said.

The event, which is for students who are or will be 18 years old by Nov. 3, 2020, is crucial in getting eligible voters registered  for this year’s upcoming elections.

Although the general election doesn’t take place until November, the registration had to be done on Jan. 24.

“Today is important because [students] can voice their opinion and vote in the bond issue,” Usher said.

On Feb. 11, there will be a bond election on whether LPS should use $290 million for new facilities. The district wants to ensure that all current students eligible to vote have a say in the bond issue, so the voter registration had to happen this early.

Along with the bond issue, students will be able to vote in the primary election and the general election for the president later this year. But, students can only vote in the primary election if they register with a political party. Nebraska primaries are only open to registered voters, meaning that an independent cannot vote.

“It’s important to vote in primaries, because [even if you affiliate as an independent], you can choose between the degrees in [either political parties] policies,” Usher said.

Usher was happy with the amount of students who registered to vote on Friday.  She said getting more young people involved is what will make the elections more balanced.

“It’s important to get [students] registered so they can voice their opinion in our democracy,” Usher said. “They’ll be the ones running the country in the future.”